How Colour Branding is working in Politics

Elections in India have become a huge gala of sound, noise and drama. Add the songs, events, digital marketing and you get a full 360 marketing campaign.

Today’s public held swearing-in ceremony at the state capital Kolkata, was fashionable.

The newly elected party had in huge doses, a political brand presence. It demonstrated people power, by the sheer number of human population surrounding the event and an association with a certain color scheme, liberally used in the decorations. For a State that boasts of as much  land territory and population as that of a small country ; a state language (Bengali) which has 211 million speakers in the world; a grand event did not seem unusual.

A creative like me with absolutely zero to borderline interest in the political scene, was surprised by the recent election campaigns used by various political parties. I grew up in the New Delhi area in the 80’s and 90’s, when every national event or visiting dignitary visit (there were plenty) had elaborate doses of tri-coloured flower & leaf arrangement or the “many-flowerpots-arrangement” of the horticulture department. While Marigold / Dahlias were usually denoting the Orange, the Leafy Palms represented the Green band in the national flag. I am forgetting what they did about the whites. Petunias, maybe.

In the national elections a couple of years back, while one party; (represented by the holy saffron hue bordering on fanta orange), tried to bring in the green and white in many places in its ad space, it was perhaps  primarily seeking to be identified with its lotus orange usp. Fanta, Vodaphone and other brands have successfully used the orange colour to show excitement and cheer in their logos.

The Bengal party, after branding the city with Blue and White (seemed to be borrowed from the sari of the Missionaries of Charity) and now adorning everything from lampposts, railings to the great event itself; exemplifies the success of its understanding of colour perception.

What remains unbranded perhaps is the rest of the contingent of the political nobles. Will it be a wonder if lack of symbolic colour translated to the lack in its personality? Or worse, the choice of a wrong colour could signal contrary emotions? Let’s wait and watch.

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Baby steps to Branding a city

When these pictures were taken, the elections were in full swing in West Bengal, one of the eastern state of India. I gauge that the predominant Blue and white paint which is adorning each pavement, divider and most buildings, has been done in the recent past. And if you are traveling at night, be greeted by blue and white led lights twined around what would have been once, charming lampposts. Said to be reflective of the colors of the present ruling political party, it seems a bit overdone.

Other hilarious such instances which can be recalled in other states is a Shivaji statue sprouting up in all places and planned to be erected on an island in the Indian Ocean; another one decided to erect party symbol, Elephant sculptures, in her particular state.

Ironically however, the color choice is quite apt for the city. The colors are associative of the saris of Missionaries of Charity and Mother Teresa who lived here many years. Blue and white are colors which are extremely soothing in the hot and humid weather. I recall standing in a fort in Jodhpur, Rajasthan and looking below at the sea of houses painted in a hue of blue. The local boy informed me that “neel” a local coloring agent used for clothes is added to the white wash of outdoor structures and is said to keep the houses a few degrees cooler in this desert state.

So Yes. Blue and white is good, but in limited quantities. City populous and artist community opinions should be considered before widespread branding affecting the city space. Maybe some out of the other 20 million who inhabit this city could have good ideas on what their surroundings should be like.